Urinary System

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Movie: Urinary System
Vitamin D from the diet or skin synthesis is biologically inactive; enzymatic conversion hydroxylation in the liver and kidney is required for activation. In the case of the body being dehydrated, the kidneys reabsorb as much water as possible back into the blood to produce highly concentrated urine full of excreted ions and wastes. The VDR regulates cell proliferation and differentiation. Breaking fat into small pieces. Modern teleost fishes have flexible fin rays called soft rays of jointed segments of bone, or spiny rays, each of solid continuous bone. Question thoroughly and closely.

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What Is a Urologist?

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Hotel and Lodging Management and Operations. Spanish for the Workplace. Human Growth and Development. Research Methods in Psychology. In the case of the body being dehydrated, the kidneys reabsorb as much water as possible back into the blood to produce highly concentrated urine full of excreted ions and wastes. The changes in excretion of water are controlled by antidiuretic hormone ADH. ADH is produced in the hypothalamus and released by the posterior pituitary gland to help the body retain water.

When blood pressure is elevated, the kidneys can help to reduce blood pressure by reducing the volume of blood in the body.

The kidneys are able to reduce blood volume by reducing the reabsorption of water into the blood and producing watery, dilute urine. When blood pressure becomes too low, the kidneys can produce the enzyme renin to constrict blood vessels and produce concentrated urine, which allows more water to remain in the blood. Inside each kidney are around a million tiny structures called nephrons.

The nephron is the functional unit of the kidney that filters blood to produce urine. Arterioles in the kidneys deliver blood to a bundle of capillaries surrounded by a capsule called a glomerulus. The liquid filtrate in the capsule flows through a series of tubules lined with filtering cells and surrounded by capillaries.

The cells surrounding the tubules selectively absorb water and substances from the filtrate in the tubule and return it to the blood in the capillaries. At the same time, waste products present in the blood are secreted into the filtrate. By the end of this process, the filtrate in the tubule has become urine containing only water, waste products, and excess ions. The blood exiting the capillaries has reabsorbed all of the nutrients along with most of the water and ions that the body needs to function.

After urine has been produced by the kidneys, it is transported through the ureters to the urinary bladder. The urinary bladder fills with urine and stores it until the body is ready for its excretion. When the volume of the urinary bladder reaches anywhere from to milliliters, its walls begin to stretch and stretch receptors in its walls send signals to the brain and spinal cord. These signals result in the relaxation of the involuntary internal urethral sphincter and the sensation of needing to urinate.

Urination may be delayed as long as the bladder does not exceed its maximum volume, but increasing nerve signals lead to greater discomfort and desire to urinate. Urination is the process of releasing urine from the urinary bladder through the urethra and out of the body. The process of urination begins when the muscles of the urethral sphincters relax, allowing urine to pass through the urethra. At the same time that the sphincters relax, the smooth muscle in the walls of the urinary bladder contract to expel urine from the bladder.

The kidneys produce and interact with several hormones that are involved in the control of systems outside of the urinary system. Calcitriol is the active form of vitamin D in the human body. It is produced by the kidneys from precursor molecules produced by UV radiation striking the skin. Calcitriol works together with parathyroid hormone PTH to raise the level of calcium ions in the bloodstream.

When the level of calcium ions in the blood drops below a threshold level, the parathyroid glands release PTH, which in turn stimulates the kidneys to release calcitriol.

Calcitriol promotes the small intestine to absorb calcium from food and deposit it into the bloodstream. It also stimulates the osteoclasts of the skeletal system to break down bone matrix to release calcium ions into the blood.

Erythropoietin, also known as EPO, is a hormone that is produced by the kidneys to stimulate the production of red blood cells. The kidneys monitor the condition of the blood that passes through their capillaries, including the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood.

When the blood becomes hypoxic, meaning that it is carrying deficient levels of oxygen, cells lining the capillaries begin producing EPO and release it into the bloodstream. EPO travels through the blood to the r ed bone marrow , where it stimulates hematopoietic cells to increase their rate of red blood cell production. Renin is not a hormone itself, but an enzyme that the kidneys produce to start the renin-angiotensin system RAS. The RAS increases blood volume and blood pressure in response to low blood pressure, blood loss, or dehydration.

Renin is released into the blood where it catalyzes angiotensinogen from the liver into angiotensin I. Angiotensin I is further catalyzed by another enzyme into Angiotensin II. Angiotensin II stimulates several processes, including stimulating the adrenal cortex to produce the hormone aldosterone.

Aldosterone then changes the function of the kidneys to increase the reabsorption of water and sodium ions into the blood, increasing blood volume and raising blood pressure.

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