Circulatory

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Gastrointestinal tract
Your tongue helps out, pushing the food around while you chew with your teeth. In recent studies, changes in blood lactate concentration over time have been particularly useful to determine the prognosis for survival, with increasing concentrations being associated with a poor prognosis. Rico-Guevara and Rubega found that hummingbird tongues do not function like a pair of tiny, static tubes drawing up floral nectar via capillary action. Protection Against Components of Enteric Bacteria: This ileocecal fold is used as a landmark to locate the ileum during abdominal surgery. We had a fantastic time learning about the digestive system! Take your organs out of the freezer and lay them icing side down on your cake.

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Let’s Take A Trip Through The Digestive System!

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What makes a carb good and what makes it bad? Turns out carbs alone can't be faulted for any weight issues - it's the combination of how and what you…. Approximately 1 in 6 U. The digestive system is essentially a long, twisting tube that runs from the mouth to the anus, plus a few other organs like the liver and pancreas that produce or store digestive chemicals. The start of the process - the mouth: The digestive process begins in the mouth. Food is partly broken down by the process of chewing and by the chemical action of salivary enzymes these enzymes are produced by the salivary glands and break down starches into smaller molecules.

On the way to the stomach: The esophagus is a long tube that runs from the mouth to the stomach. It uses rhythmic, wave-like muscle movements called peristalsis to force food from the throat into the stomach. This muscle movement gives us the ability to eat or drink even when we're upside-down.

In the stomach - The stomach is a large, sack-like organ that churns the food and bathes it in a very strong acid gastric acid. Food in the stomach that is partly digested and mixed with stomach acids is called chyme.

In the small intestine - After being in the stomach, food enters the duodenum, the first part of the small intestine. It then enters the jejunum and then the ileum the final part of the small intestine. In the small intestine, bile produced in the liver and stored in the gall bladder , pancreatic enzymes, and other digestive enzymes produced by the inner wall of the small intestine help in the breakdown of food.

In the large intestine - After passing through the small intestine, food passes into the large intestine. In the large intestine, some of the water and electrolytes chemicals like sodium are removed from the food. Many microbes bacteria like Bacteroides , Lactobacillus acidophilus , Escherichia coli , and Klebsiella in the large intestine help in the digestion process. The gallbladder is used to store and recycle excess bile from the small intestine so that it can be reused for the digestion of subsequent meals.

The pancreas is a large gland located just inferior and posterior to the stomach. The pancreas secretes digestive enzymes into the small intestine to complete the chemical digestion of foods. The large intestine is a long, thick tube about 2. It is located just inferior to the stomach and wraps around the superior and lateral border of the small intestine. The large intestine absorbs water and contains many symbiotic bacteria that aid in the breaking down of wastes to extract some small amounts of nutrients.

Feces in the large intestine exit the body through the anal canal. The digestive system is responsible for taking whole foods and turning them into energy and nutrients to allow the body to function, grow, and repair itself. The six primary processes of the digestive system include:. The first function of the digestive system is ingestion, or the intake of food. The mouth is responsible for this function, as it is the orifice through which all food enters the body.

The mouth and stomach are also responsible for the storage of food as it is waiting to be digested. This storage capacity allows the body to eat only a few times each day and to ingest more food than it can process at one time. In the course of a day, the digestive system secretes around 7 liters of fluids. These fluids include saliva, mucus, hydrochloric acid, enzymes, and bile.

Saliva moistens dry food and contains salivary amylase, a digestive enzyme that begins the digestion of carbohydrates. Mucus serves as a protective barrier and lubricant inside of the GI tract.

Hydrochloric acid helps to digest food chemically and protects the body by killing bacteria present in our food. Enzymes are like tiny biochemical machines that disassemble large macromolecules like proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids into their smaller components. Finally, bile is used to emulsify large masses of lipids into tiny globules for easy digestion.

Digestion is the process of turning large pieces of food into its component chemicals. Mechanical digestion is the physical breakdown of large pieces of food into smaller pieces. This mode of digestion begins with the chewing of food by the teeth and is continued through the muscular mixing of food by the stomach and intestines.

It’s an anatomy cake of SCIENCE!!!!